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COURSE SYLLABUS

Political Institutionalism 7.5 credits

Politisk institutionalism
Second cycle, S7015N
Version
Course syllabus valid: Autumn 2021 Sp 1 - Present
The version indicates the term and period for which this course syllabus is valid. The most recent version of the course syllabus is shown first.


Education level
Second cycle
Grade scale
U G VG *
Subject
Political Science
Subject group (SCB)
Political Science
Main field of study
Political Science

Entry requirements

Bachelor's degree with a major in Political science, or equivalent.


More information about English language requirements


Selection

The selection is based on 20-285 credits



Course Aim
The study of institutions is and has been a central part of political science since Aristotle, and constitutes a necessary tool to be able to analyze and discuss the central aspects of political governance and development. This course moves beyond the classical political science institutionalism and deals primarily with modern approaches to the study of human behavior and interaction within different types of institutions. The overall aims of the course are partly to increase the course participants 'ability to discuss what institutional theory means for the study of phenomena in the political world, and partly to increase the course participants' ability to use political institutionalism as an approach to formulate, structure and address their own research issues. 

The course participant must, after completing the course, be able to: 
• Summarize, explain and discuss, verbally as well as in writing, different approaches and basic assumptions within institutional theory, as well as their relevance to political science research 
• Compare, discuss and analyze connections and contradictions between different reasoning within political institutionalism 
• Independently apply different approaches in political institutionalism to illuminate and analyze political phenomena and development patterns 
• Use different institutional theories to formulate, structure and tackle own research issues 
• Utilize scientific articles and apply their content 
• Independently search for relevant knowledge in both printed and Internet-based sources 
• Independently relate to, critically review and evaluate this knowledge 
• Demonstrate skills in oral as well as written presentation and communication techniques 
• Identify the need for additional knowledge within the course subject area 

Contents
Institutional theory has become increasingly important in the social sciences, especially in the last decade; both in national and business economics as well as psychology, sociology and political science. The course focuses mainly on the institutional theory of political science, although elements from other disciplines also make up a smaller part. Within political institutionalism, the main focus is on the so-called neo-institutional theory formation and its insights into the significance of institutional arrangements for the design of human interaction and societal behavioral and developmental patterns. 

Throughout the course, a number of generic skills are also dealt with, which are put into practical application during the course. Special emphasis is placed on the ability to independently seek, evaluate and critically examine knowledge, as well as on the ability to present and communicate this both orally and in writing. 

The course covers the following areas: 
• The neo-institutional theory formation - with a focus on the perspectives within the normative; rational choice; historical; and empirical institutionalism 
• What constitutes an institution and what criteria can be used to determine whether an institution exists or not 
• How institutions arise, are formed and disappear (institutionalization and deinstitutionalization processes) • How institutions change - both intentionally and through slow development processes 
• The interaction between people and institutions, and the importance of institutions for the design and limitation of human behavior in general and political, social and economic life in particular. 
• How institutions function, ie through which social and political processes they fulfill their purposes 
• How institutional elements are imported and translated in and between organizations 
• Different methodological approaches to the study of institutionalization processes, at both macro and micro level 
• The institutional concept's connection to other central political science concepts such as social dilemmas, rationality, collective action, trust, confidence and legitimacy 

Realization
Each course occasion´s language and form is stated and appear on the course page on Luleå University of Technology's website.
Teaching takes place in the form of lectures and compulsory seminar exercises. The lectures introduce students to the central themes included in the course and give examples of their empirical application. The seminar exercises examine the ability to: 

• Summarize, explain and discuss, verbally as well as in writing, different approaches and basic assumptions within institutional theory, as well as their relevance to political science research 
• Compare, discuss and analyze connections and contradictions between different reasoning within political institutionalism 
• Independently apply different approaches in political institutionalism to illuminate and analyze political phenomena and development patterns 
• Use different institutional theories to formulate, structure and tackle own research issues 
• Utilize scientific articles and apply their content 
• Independently search for relevant knowledge in both printed and Internet-based sources 
• Independently relate to, critically review and evaluate this knowledge 
• Demonstrate skills in oral as well as written presentation and communication techniques 
• Identify the need for additional knowledge within the course subject area 

Prior to the seminar exercises, the course participants receive information and questions related to the current course literature, which are then dealt with at the seminar, in the form of an oral discussion and written submissions. Active participation in each seminar is a requirement. 

Examination
If there is a decision on special educational support, in accordance with the Guideline Student's rights and obligations at Luleå University of Technology, an adapted or alternative form of examination can be provided.
Oral assignments in the form of seminar exercises with accompanying written assignments examine the ability to: 

• Summarize, explain and discuss, verbally as well as in writing, different approaches and basic assumptions within institutional theory, as well as their relevance to political science research 
• Compare, discuss and analyze connections and contradictions between different reasoning within political institutionalism 
• Independently apply different approaches in political institutionalism to illuminate and analyze political phenomena and development patterns 
• Use different institutional theories to formulate, structure and tackle own research issues 
• Utilize scientific articles and apply their content 
• Independently search for relevant knowledge in both printed and Internet-based sources 
• Independently relate to, critically review and evaluate this knowledge 
• Demonstrate skills in oral as well as written presentation and communication techniques 
• Identify the need for additional knowledge within the course subject area 

Oral assignments correspond to 50% of the final grade on the course and examine the ability to orally present acquired knowledge according to the course objectives. Written assignments correspond to 50% of the final grade on the course and examine the ability to report in writing the acquired knowledge according to the course objectives. 

All examinations must be completed with at least a passed result in order for grades on the course to be awarded. 

Remarks
Students must register for the courses themselves or contact ETKS educational administration, eduetks@ltu.se not later than three days after the quarter commences. Failure to do so can result in the place being lost. This rule also applies to students with a guaranteed place.

Examiner
Charlotta Söderberg

Literature. Valid from Autumn 2021 Sp 1
Ekengren, A-M. och Hinnfors, J. (2012) Uppsatshandbok – Hur du lyckas med din uppsats. 2nd. ed. Lund: Studentlitteratur.
Peters, B. G. (latest edition). Institutional Theory in Political Science. London: Continuum.
North D. C. (latest edition). Institutions, Institutional Change, and Economic Performance. Cambridge: CUP.
Ostrom, E. (latest edition). Understanding Institutional Diversity. Princeton, NJ: PUP.
Article compendium
Additional literature may be added during the course.

Course offered by
Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts

Modules
CodeDescriptionGrade scaleCrStatusFrom periodTitle
0002Oral and written assignmentsU G VG *7.50MandatoryA17

Study guidance
Study guidance for the course is to be found in our learning platform Canvas before the course starts. Students applying for single subject courses get more information in the Welcome letter. You will find the learning platform via My LTU.

Syllabus established
by Head of the Department of Business Administration and Social Sciences 19 Feb 2010

Last revised
by Director of Undergraduate Studies Daniel Örtqvist, Department of Social Sciences, Technology and Arts 17 Feb 2021