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Industrial flow mechanics

Published: 19 May 2021

Flows in piping systems are common in a variety of industrial applications. We give you basic knowledge in the subject.

About the course

This course aims to strengthen the participants' ability to perform calculations in pipe systems, and to provide an introduction to model experiments. The aim is that the participant after the end of the course should have familiarity with dimensioning pipe size, valves and pumps for optimal performance of a pipe system. Theory is interspersed with practice sessions where the participants themselves can count.

You get to learn

  • Use Bernoulli's equation, find out about its shortcomings and when the energy equation is more suitable to use
  • Calculate losses in pipe systems containing bends, expansions / contractions
  • Dimension valves in piping systems in accordance with current IEC standards
  • Dimensioning pumps in pipe systems
  • Count on model experiments and relate the results to the corresponding prototype

The course contains

The continuity equation and its use in pipe systems, loss calculations in pipes, dimensioning of valves and pumps, calculation of and dimensioning of models and scaling up to the corresponding prototype.

Arrangement

The course is conducted over two full days from lunch to lunch. The teaching consists of lectures and lessons. The course does not contain any examination, but the participant receives a certificate after completing the course.

Teacher

Educators will be teachers from the Department of Fluid Mechanics and Experimental Mechanics at Luleå University of Technology as well as specialists from industry.

Joel Sundström

Joel Sundström,

Phone: +46 (0)920 491627
Organisation: Fluid Mechanics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics
Gunnar Hellström

Gunnar Hellström, Associate Professor

Phone: +46 (0)920 491045
Organisation: Fluid Mechanics, Fluid and Experimental Mechanics, Department of Engineering Sciences and Mathematics