Quadcopter
The project team that developed a quadcopter for inspecting mine shafts. Emil Lundell, Fredrik Grönlund, Henrik Tjäder, Daniel Björk, Lars Jonsson, Max Unander and Kamal Alkahwati. View original picture , opens in new tab/window

Exciting technology solutions for student projects

Published: 27 December 2017

A quadcopter for mining inspection, a rudder for measuring forces in water and a car with a multi-core processor. Three student projects with technical solutions for air, water and land have been presented in Vetenskapens hus.

The students are studying at the Master Programme in Computer Science and Engineering and the Master Programme in Engineering Physics and Electrical Engineering. All three projects' focus were on applications of embedded systems in vehicles, in this case a quadcopter, a model car and a sailboat.

Kamal Alkahwati is project leader for the Quad copter project. In the project, the students have developed a prototype of a drone that can be used for inspection and measurement of a mine shaft. A  laser scanner is placed on the drone providing a 3D model of the inaccessible environment.

– We have built a quad copter with software and electronics. By using the quad copter we will effectively be able to map up a mine shaft, says Kamal Alkahwati.

What has been the most fun about working in the project?

– To learn from eachother, that has been very interesting. Also, it was a very nice feeling when a bunch of (almost) finished engineers combined their heads and did exactly what we should do – solve problems.

What have been most challening?

– To create a system where many elements are interdependent, both software and hardware. It has been very rewarding – and annoying, of course – to encounter bugs and try to solve them.

Pontus Ridderström has led the Alpha car project, a project that aimed to test the possibility of using a powerful multi-core computer to centralize functionality in cars. Everything has been implemented in a radio-controlled model car.

– A problem in the automotive industry is that there are too many small computers in cars today. We implemented a control system that actively assists the driver when driving: TC (Traction Control) and ABS, says Pontus Ridderström.

What has been the most fun while working on the project?

– To drive the car and see the result when our control system is switched on than when it is relaxed, for example, the difference between the active traction control and traction control disconnected.

The third project presented is called Dinghyprojektet. In Dinghyprojektet measured, among other things, water pressure in a båtroder in order to find out how the boat is affected by the forces of water. It is hoped that the knowledge of what is happening under the water can improve the skills of such a sailor.

Alpha car, Luleå University of Technology Photo: Linda Alfredsson
The project group Alpha car: Kristoffer Riddarström, Johan Aasa, David Eng, Fredrik Nordin, Andreas Heffsten, Mattias Wallin, Axel Halen, David Boman och Pontus Ridderström. Missing in the picture is William Mokhlef.

Pontus Ridderström has led the Alpha car project, a project that aimed to test the possibility of using a powerful multi-core computer to centralize functionality in cars. Everything has been implemented in a radio-controlled model car.

– A problem in the automotive industry is that there are too many small computers in the cars. We implemented a control system that actively assists the driver when driving: TC (Traction Control) and ABS, says Pontus Ridderström.

What has been the most fun while working on the project?

– To drive the car and see the result when our control system was switched on.

The third project presented is called the Dinghy project. In the Dinghy project water pressure is measured on a rudder in order to find out how the boat is affected by the forces of water. Hopefully that knowledge of what happens under the water surface, can improve sailor skills.