Stefan Candefjord, PhD at Luleå University. has developed a model for improving the understanding of prostate cancer. Photo: Glenn Borg

Improved accuracy in the treatment of prostate cancer

Published: 22 June 2011

Researchers at Luleå University of Technology are working to develop a tool to better detect prostate cancer. By combining two methods positive properties can bring the best use while the disadvantages can be compensated. In a new dissertation at the university methods for that has been produced

- We have developed a model to compare data from the two different methods and using it, we hope that the new relationship between tumor stiffness and molecular content will be discovered, which would increase our understanding of prostate cancer, said Stefan Candefjord, PhD Luleå University of Technology.

His thesis shows that there is a great need for new methods for detection of prostate cancer. It is the most common cancer among men in Sweden and about 2500 die from the disease each year. Surgery is often common and most appropriate form of treatment, but it is difficult for surgeons to identify what is healthy and diseased tissue. Therefore parts of the tumor can be missed, which increases the risk of relapse. However, there are two techniques that researchers at Luleå University of Technology are trying to combine into a new instrument that can detect residual cancer.

- It is partly about a resonant sensor which can detect tumors when they are usually harder than healthy tissue and partly on Raman spectroscopy that can detect cancer based on changes in tissue biochemical content, and in my dissertation, I take the first step towards the realization of such an instrument, says Stefan Candefjord.

He has in his research also developed a "learning algorithm" that can recognize different healthy tissue types and distinguish between healthy and unhealty cancer tissues based on laboratory measurements from pigs and humans. Nearly 8 out of 10 points could be identified correctly by using the algorithm.

- It shows that the proposed instrument could be of great help in surgery of prostate cancer, he says.

The instrument provides good accuracy and reduces the risk that to much healthy tissue is removed, which reduces side effects such as impotence and incontinence. In five years, researchers hope that an instrument have been  developed.

 

- It is partly about a resonant sensor which can detect tumors when they are usually harder than healthy tissue and partly on Raman spectroscopy that can detect cancer based on changes in tissue biochemical content, and in my dissertation, I take the first step towards the realization of such an instrument, says Stefan Candefjord.

He has in his research also developed a "learning algorithm" that can recognize different healthy tissue types and distinguish between healthy and unhealty cancer tissues based on laboratory measurements from pigs and humans. Nearly 8 out of 10 points could be identified correctly by using the algorithm.

- It shows that the proposed instrument could be of great help in surgery of prostate cancer, he says.

The instrument provides good accuracy and reduces the risk that to much healthy tissue is removed, which reduces side effects such as impotence and incontinence. In five years, researchers hope that an instrument have been  developed.