Research Degrees in English and Education (PhD)

Published: 28 January 2014

It is possible to study for a PhD in English and Education at Luleå University of Technology. A Swedish PhD requires four years of fulltime study or can take five years if the student takes on teaching duties within the subject. Doctoral candidates complete 60 hp of course work within their first two years of the degree. The dissertation, which can take the form of articles or a monograph, is normally supervised by two experienced researchers who meet the doctoral candidates individually on a regular basis throughout their studies. Work in progress is also presented at research seminars which are open to other members of the research community.

Doctoral students can only be hired by the university when positions are opened for competitive application. These positions are announced on LTU’s list of vacancies. Applicants are expected to have completed their MA degree with a high grade. Applications require a full research plan and a sample of the applicant’s academic writing (for instance, a degree essay). Applicants who are able to demonstrate that they have their own funding for the duration of the research period can also be considered for PhD studies. Such applicants should contact the Head of Subject, Prof. Lydia Kokkola.

Cotutelle Agreements (Double Degrees)

It is also possible to take a Double PhD degree by forming a cotutelle agreement between LTU and another university. The subject of English and Education has so far formed two cotuitelle agreements, one with the University of Turku (Finland) and the other with Åbo Akademi University (Finland). Under a cotutelle agreement, the doctoral student only writes one dissertation, but the supervision and course work is divided between the two universities. At the end, there is only one disputation or viva, but the examination needs to meet all the criteria of both countries. A cotutelle agreement enables doctoral students to gain access to the specialist expertise in more than one university, to benefit from the research communities in both university and to gain access to the networks and funding bodies associated with both environments. In practice, this usually means that the student lives and works at each university for extended periods during the course of their degree studies.