Students' Rights and Obligations

Published: 9 November 2012

In Sweden, the activities of universities and colleges are governed by laws and regulations such as the Higher Education Act (1992:1434) (HL), the Higher Education Ordinance (1993:100) (HF) and the Administrative Law (2017:900). The accepted code of conduct has been established by the Higher Education Appeals Board and the Swedish Higher Education Authority (UKÄ) and is used as a guideline only. The university may also make decisions on certain issues autonomously using local regulations and governing documents.

In some parts, these guidelines are based directly on provisions in HL and HF and the guidelines have been prepared and further developed in consultation between the university and representatives of the student unions.

In addition to these guidelines, there are also internal university steering documents that deal with related issues.

If a student considers that university or a specific department does not comply with these guidelines, the student should apply for correction, primarily with the relevant teacher or examiner via the relevant decision-makers in the professional support department. Heads of Department, Heads of Education, Education Leaders and other responsible managers may, of course, also be contacted. Support in such matters can also be sought from the student unions. All matters that the university handles shall be treated without unnecessary delay.

If a student finds that something is wrong, regardless of whether it is harassment, lessons during the examination period, poor study environment or other things, it is important that the student points this out to the university in order to correct any inaccuracies and ambiguities.

The Purpose of the Guidelines

These guidelines strive to clarify a number of issues that are central to the students' everyday study activities and aim to make clear routines for a predictable and legally secure order. It is important for the student to know which routines apply and that the departments and the university have a clear framework on these issues.